The Yankee

The Yankee

Screenplay by Alan Nafzger

A group of young boys in Mexico travel to confront a national hero and professional baseball player about his drinking and womanizing.

After reading a Mexico City newspaper article about the death of a former professional athlete, a man recalls a childhood effort to conceal a car wreck in Monterrey Mexico.

In 1959, a well known professional baseball player has crashed his car into a tree just far off the road to be unnoticed, EXCEPT by a group of young boys.

With the boys innocent of this behavior, their basic instinct is to protect their hero.

In the trunk of the car the boys find the player’s bat and glove.

In the glove box, they find automobile registration information.

In the front passenger seat, they find an unconscious American woman.

The player has disappeared, leaving the scene of the accident.

The boys conduct a long and important debate.

A four young boys, inseparable friends all, set out to find a Mexican man and player for the New York Yankees.

Most of the boys have the simple goal of returning the bat and glove to the player.

One boy only wants to confront the player.

The foursome consists of intellectual Juan Camilo, born leader Arturo, emotionally disturbed Dante and chubby hanger-on Mateo.

The boys’ adventure en route to Mexico City is colored by the personal pressures brought to bear on all of them by the adult world.

In dealing with the situation, the young Mexican boys learn about themselves, the meaning of friendship, the meaning of success and the need to stand up for what is right.

SCREENPLAY PLOT

After reading a newspaper article about the death of a former professional athlete, a Mexican man recalls a childhood effort to conceal a car wreck in Monterrey Mexico.

A well known professional baseball player has crashed his car into a tree just far off the road to be unnoticed, EXCEPT by a group of young boys. Exposed by the media as a drunken womanizer, the boys basic instinct is to protect their hero.

A drunken and womanizing professional baseball player in the off season in September 1959, runs off the road. In the trunk of the car the boys find the player’s bat and glove. In the glove box, they find automobile registration information. In the front passenger seat they find an unconscious American woman. Leaving the scene of the accident, the player has disappeared.

After a great debate, the boys begin a journey to Mexico City to find the baseball player. Most of the boys have the simple goal of returning the bat and glove to the player. One boy only wants to confront the player.

A quartet of young boys, inseparable friends all, set out to find a Mexican man and player for the New York Yankees. The foursome consists of intellectual Juan Camilo, born leader Arturo, emotionally disturbed Dante, and chubby hanger-on Mateo. The boys’ adventure en route to the elusive ballplayer is colored by the personal pressures brought to bear on all of them by the adult world.

In dealing with the situation, the young Mexican boys learn about themselves, the meaning of friendship, success and the need to stand up for what is right.

 

movie baseball players
baseball players

 

Magical realism, done right, can thrill. I think that. There’s nothing like a movie where imperceptible narrative threads all come together in concert and the audience suddenly realizes what they about to see and the hair on the back of their neck stands up and then the film nails it. Computer graphics has made this is the age of magical realism in film. We are entering an age where filmmakers are going to very quietly start doing impossible things on a daily basis. You’ll see a film sometime in the next five or ten years, and you’ll completely accept every part of what you saw as what it purported to be, and when you are told what you really were watching, you will calmly, with the full weight of all of your professional experience behind you, explain that it is impossible. This is magical realism!

– Alan Nafzger, May 23, 2014

 

 

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